Say Hello to Australopithecus deyiremeda, A Newly Discovered 3.4 Million Year Old Hominid

4 Dec

I love archeology!

Anthropology.net

This fragment of upper jaw (shown) was discovered sitting on top of the sediment in the Woranso-Mille area of central Afar in Ethiopia. Anthropologists have now identified it as belonging to a new species of early human ancestor called Australopithecus deyiremeda that lived between 3.3 million and 3.5 million years ago This fragment of upper jaw (shown) was discovered sitting on top of the sediment in the Woranso-Mille area of central Afar in Ethiopia. Anthropologists have now identified it as belonging to a new species of early human ancestor called Australopithecus deyiremeda that lived between 3.3 million and 3.5 million years ago

A study published in Nature today announces the 2011 discovery of Australopithecus deyiremeda a hominid that lived between 3.3 and 3.5 million years ago. The species is represented by a maxilla, mandible and dentition found in the Woranso-Mille area of the Afar region of Ethiopia about 22 miles from the spot where the remains of Australopithecus afarensis were found. A. afarenis is thought to have lived between 3.9 million and 2.9 million years ago.

The size of the jawbone and the shape of the teeth of the new species resemble that of afarensis, but the researchers lay claim in their paper…

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Examination of normal and pathologic fear

2 Dec

Hereticdoc

Have a safe, educational, and happy Halloween

Overview

Sight, sound, and other sensory input are initially the processors and contributors into our central nervous system of fear in our species. The sensory inputs specifically directly into several areas in our brain starting with the thalamus, then to the amygdala and cortex, generating a nearly immediate fear response. We  become conscious of our fear by either a direct or an indirect pathway, depending upon the stimuli in the environment and situation; we have evolved a highly sophisticated fear response as this is a vitally important emotional component in our repertoire.  This emotion may become pathologic in a variety of scenarios, and I will pay some  minor attention to PTSD.

Fear is the reaction to a perceived threat. Anxiety is the fear response when no threat exists, and which may become pathologic. In the case of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), the…

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Show the Love

20 Jul

What about showing more Love?
Here is Rusty’s post.

Rusty Carroll's life, and observations.

Let’s have a lovefest, and show the love. It is up to you to decide how you do it, but show the love. I feel there is too much hate and negativity going on.

So I am asking everyone to show the love!

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Peace love and happiness.

As always Rusty loves you.

Posted from WordPress for Android

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Trapped

30 May

Anyone else feel trapped inside of themselves?

The God Extinguisher

I will try to make this as short as possible and it will not be revealing in any way. 🙂
This is just my thoughts and it has far less to do with sexuality than you might think.

Since puberty I’ve questioned myself, my gender and my sexuality, almost every single day.
Why?
This takes a little time travel so here we go. 🙂

[BLAM!]
We are now in the year of the Kennedy shoting, 1963.
I was born and my parents where… a bit special.
My mother was a hard working, strong, no-nonsense kind of woman and my father was the same kind of straight forward man. He was also a professional criminal.

Growing up, I met a lot of “special” people.
Many of them had criminal records a mile long.
Some where gay, some where hetero, some where… something else.
I learned at an early stage that “the…

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before you knock

26 May

before you knock.

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before you knock

26 May

befor

e you knock.

You might not be able to spot the nightjar, but you can hear it

26 May

Why Evolution Is True

by Matthew Cobb

I used to run a field course for second-year university students at Saint-Auban in the foothills of the French Alps. My favourite bit of the course was when we would drive out at dusk into a deserted valley (seen in the picture below, taken from a nearby peak) and observe the local animals as they emerged from the forest. We would regularly see lowland hare, fox, roe deer and, if we were very lucky, wild boar.

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In the parts of the valley that are dominated by heathland, out of sight on the photo, we would encounter the eerie nightjar. Often, the first sight of this amazing bird would generally be the gleam of its red eye, reflected in the car headlights. For reasons that I don’t think anyone understands, nightjars tend to sit in the middle of the road, playing chicken with any oncoming car. Maybe they…

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